Sunday Archive: Wyrd, TeNaNoWriMo, and Tai Chi

Every Sunday (OK, not the last two, but most Sundays lately), I’ve been trying to post three random posts from the Archive (over 2,000 posts!) so that people get to read across the length and breadth of my blogging career.  This week has some goodies:

  1. Wyrd: I used to do a lot more gaming than I do now, and I would like to get back into it.  On this occasion, back in 2005, I was playing a game called Wyrd.  It uses black and white stones to represent tragedies and successes in the lives of its characters.  It’s not too bad a game, although I don’t think I own it any more.  I think for me, this represents one of the great untapped potentials of school today — our kids are eager and willing to play games, and we could teach them so many possible games, as a way of explaining history, math and science to them. Yet we don’t.
  2. TeNaNoWriMo Update: This post, from 2009, is about my effort to write a novel.  You may have heard about National Novel Writing Month.  Of course, most of us as teachers are not able to be involved in writing a Novel (of 50,000 or 100,000 words or any length) in November. We’re too busy with far too many other things!  So this is part of my effort to do the National Novel Writing Month thing in a different month, namely June — when in theory we have the time to do so.  I think, though, that the nature of this is tricky.  Why do we not encourage our students to try for these sorts of big projects?
  3. Tai Chi Day 112: I used to do a Tai Chi form every day, even under the most ridiculous conditions.  On this  occasion, I’d just come home from a trip to Sicily with my dad.  From this post, I learn that I really have to get started on doing tai chi again on a daily basis. The yoga is nice, but I miss the moving meditation of the Chi work, as well.  And maybe I can encourage some kids to learn this form with me, when we start learning about China later this month.

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