Emerging Technology

1. Gravity-based simple electronic drawing tool

Here’s a tool for drawing images, sketches and other designs which respond to gravity. Looks cool.

2. Extendible Desktop Surfaces

A simple camera and projector makes it possible to project your computer’s desktop onto the surrounding physical desktop. Wow.

3. Fabrication Laboratories

I hardly understand anything this guys says, but it sounds like he’s talking about creating machines that make machines, and building laboratories that are capable of replicating major tools and instrumentation in distant places, in addition to creating items from the molecular level up. His phrase? “The digital revolution happened. We won. Now we’re carrying the digital revolution into the material world.” Wow.

I’m at the airport, getting ready to fly out and back to home. Around this weekend, mostly, and looking for interesting/fun things to do in Worcester or Providence, as I have plans to go to an art supply store in Providence on Saturday, and a poetry reading to Sunday.

2 comments

  1. Much Coolness, or more specifically.

    1) Useful and nifty, I expect a lot more things like this on PCs in the next 2-4 years.

    2) Cool and useful, but it also looked rather clumsy – then I saw the 1999 date – I wonder what they can do now.

    3) Wow!!! The first segments were a bit unclear, given that we couldn’t see any of the diagrams very well. However, the last portion of fabrication and the “fab-labs” was amazing. I’ve been hearing suggestions that we’ll be seeing in-home 3D printers by 2010-2013 and now I believe them. Also, the social implications, especially in the 3rd world are like something out of one of the various golden age SF novels about various world-transforming inventions. I can also see much use for the whole market-of-one idea – being able to creature custom miniatures, vehicles, and terrain could make for all manner of fun in tabletop gaming.

    Put these in every home, and at least in terms of appearance (and perhaps even function) people would be inventing more of their own designs than purchasing the rights to reproduce existing trendy designs for various home products. In addition, I’ expecting individuals to gain both impressive reputations and possibly income from selling or giving away their designs to others. Once again wow!!!

  2. Much Coolness, or more specifically.

    1) Useful and nifty, I expect a lot more things like this on PCs in the next 2-4 years.

    2) Cool and useful, but it also looked rather clumsy – then I saw the 1999 date – I wonder what they can do now.

    3) Wow!!! The first segments were a bit unclear, given that we couldn’t see any of the diagrams very well. However, the last portion of fabrication and the “fab-labs” was amazing. I’ve been hearing suggestions that we’ll be seeing in-home 3D printers by 2010-2013 and now I believe them. Also, the social implications, especially in the 3rd world are like something out of one of the various golden age SF novels about various world-transforming inventions. I can also see much use for the whole market-of-one idea – being able to creature custom miniatures, vehicles, and terrain could make for all manner of fun in tabletop gaming.

    Put these in every home, and at least in terms of appearance (and perhaps even function) people would be inventing more of their own designs than purchasing the rights to reproduce existing trendy designs for various home products. In addition, I’ expecting individuals to gain both impressive reputations and possibly income from selling or giving away their designs to others. Once again wow!!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.