OTC, Day 4

I see via the internet that Joe Lieberman has lost the primary. I’ll be happy to see him gone, assuming he does go. He’s now considering running as an independent, which might/would split the democratic vote and throw the election to the Republican party. I didn’t like Lieberman when I worked in Washington, and I don’t like him now, at least partly because the purple stripe on his toga is a little bit wider than it needs to be.

Olympic training continues to go between good and bad. One minute I’m feeling great, because the thing that I did worked, and my student got something out of it. The next minute, one of the program coaches watches my work, shakes his head and walks away. It’s more than a little distressing. On the other hand, I’m not suffering from the same kinds of stiffness, soreness and general exhaustion that some of my colleagues are suffering from, even after Monday’s Talk Until 3am Session with my roommate. Last night I even managed to get to bed at a reasonable hour. I’ll have to do a lot of reading this evening to be ready for the examination on Friday.

I’m an Olympian now, did I mention that? I signed a statement swearing to uphold the values and ethics of an Olympic coach. So if I swore the oath, that makes me an Olympian, right? Not a champion, of course. I’ve never competed, and I’ll probably never do so. But I’m now a supporter of the Olympic movement, in a sense, and that feels good. Frankly, they should do a better job of making coaches swear in, rather than handing them a slip of paper on check-in. But it’s a start, at least.

8 comments

  1. No, I don’t have practice students. I have all the other coaches in the program. There are forty-one of us, and while some of us are highly competitive fencers, there are quite a few of us (myself included) that are relatively new to fencing and fencing-coaching. This new-to-fencing group is in some ways having the easiest time, because coaches rarely hit their students; it’s all about making mistakes in creative and interesting ways to help the student practice. So the experienced fencers are having to learn to modify their reactions to leave openings and slow down for us beginners.

    Of course, it’s not exactly easy for us, either — the inexperienced fencers — because we don’t know what we’re doing on some of the actions to begin with.

  2. “Not a champion, of course.”

    I know what you mean, but as corney as it is I feel compelled to say:

    Um, as far as I am concerned, anyone who gives half a damn about any kid anywhere … not to mention a bunch of kids most of the time … is *absolutely* a champion!

  3. “Not a champion, of course.”

    I know what you mean, but as corney as it is I feel compelled to say:

    Um, as far as I am concerned, anyone who gives half a damn about any kid anywhere … not to mention a bunch of kids most of the time … is *absolutely* a champion!

  4. One minute I’m feeling great, because the thing that I did worked, and my student got something out of it.
    You have practice students? How interesting! I hope you’ll have some time to describe the whole program when you get back.

  5. One minute I’m feeling great, because the thing that I did worked, and my student got something out of it.
    You have practice students? How interesting! I hope you’ll have some time to describe the whole program when you get back.

    • No, I don’t have practice students. I have all the other coaches in the program. There are forty-one of us, and while some of us are highly competitive fencers, there are quite a few of us (myself included) that are relatively new to fencing and fencing-coaching. This new-to-fencing group is in some ways having the easiest time, because coaches rarely hit their students; it’s all about making mistakes in creative and interesting ways to help the student practice. So the experienced fencers are having to learn to modify their reactions to leave openings and slow down for us beginners.

      Of course, it’s not exactly easy for us, either — the inexperienced fencers — because we don’t know what we’re doing on some of the actions to begin with.

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