Feast of All Heras
(March 9)

Hail, great Hera, queen of Heaven and Earth,
daughter of Rhea, white-armed wife of Zeus.
You are protector of marriage and birth,
knotting the cord and cutting babies loose,
lacing the fingers of husband and wife.
Hephaestus, lord of the forge, is your son.
Your crown he wrought with poppies and feathers,
crowned pomegranate staff for happy life.
Four yoked peacocks draw your chariot on.
Your shield hangs over mothers and daughters.

Graciously guard both hearth and marriage bed;
keep gate and garden prosperous and fair.
Fill each table with honest daily bread.
Teach household tongues to speak with tender care.
For wedded bliss begins with hard labor,
in honest words spoken, heard and believed;
and jealousy begins in roving eyes.
Lord Zeus sought safety in every harbor,
and left you, lady, alone and bereaved—
Yet crowned with splendor, beautiful and wise.

Guide us to passion in familiar arms;
bless our beds with silk sheets and open ears.
Though the joy of the new has its own charms,
may love grow stronger with the tide of years
and forgiveness flow like rivers in flood.
For when Zeus ended his wandering ways
then myths ended — but true heroes were born.
Mortals show divine ancstry and blood
whenever spirits meet a lover’s gaze:
they sing like birds on the brightest spring morn.

Apologies for the delay in getting this out. I finished it before I left for Sicily, but didn’t get it typed up until today.

Update: Found this poem useful in some fashion? Consider buying my book of poems celebrating the Behenian Stars, available from Amazon (kindle) or from Etsy (PDF).