I don’t think the garbage truck has gone by yet.  I rose early this morning, performed my Lectisternia rites, which mostly consisted of reading a poem and burning some incense. It was a quiet tai chi practice this morning, marked by one remarkable “crack!” from my wrist during a Downward Punch that sounded like a tree branch breaking in high wind.  I won’t say it echoed, but it certainly startled me.  Sometimes I wonder if the work of practicing daily is just to get used to the strange sounds and noises our bodies make along the way?

As of today, it should be possible to find this site at http://andrewbwatt.com.  The old site URL should continue to work, but I’m genuinely curious if the new address shows up properly. If it does work, please drop me a comment and welcome me to my new address!

I also decided to look back at Day 185 last year.  It’s good advice, about breathing correctly, and checking your posture and position often to be sure that breath is brought in and sent out from the belly and in a steady rhythm.  But more importantly, it’s useful to note that the advice about stringing the different forms together is probably wrong.  Five Golden Coins is its own thing.  Eight Pieces of Silk is its own thing.  The Tai Chi form I do every morning is its own thing.  And combining them, like crossing the streams, is probably incorrect.  Don’t cross the streams!

I get better results, actually, with the pause between one form and another.  I’ve also discovered that it’s easier to set the correct rhythm to the movements if you know that you’re doing sixteen repetitions of Five Golden Coins movements, but only eight of Eight Pieces of Silk, and that the form is going to happen once.  I’m not likely to experience total platonic reversal (“Holy Aristotlean Repudiation, Batman! The spell-check’s correction of a made-up word is funny!”)  as Ray and Egon would have, but it’s still worth thinking of these things as three distinct pieces rather than a mash-up.