Seven lenses for visual thinking

David Gray of XPLANE did this drawing of seven lenses or frames for thinking about problems or realities. One of the things that I like about his drawings is that they almost always get me re-thinking my teaching in some fashion. This one does that almost automatically. I think how much teaching I do at the level of node or component, when I really want to teach function and system. But really, I should be teaching all of these levels all the time.

This goes into the file on rethinking how schools should work in the 21st century, especially for pagan/indigo children. Lillith, show this to your kids, and see what they think. I’d be interested to know.

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5 comments

  1. Re: My Indigo Kid

    I think it’s helpful to think of nodes as definitions, but that components are like “unpacking” a definition to think about all its individual elements, while systems or holistic thinking is common in pagan circles but not in mainstream sources except in some exalted circles.

  2. My Indigo Kid

    I will show it to Zarah. Malachi is in Houston for the school year, harder to show / talk to him about it. I’ll let you know what she says about it.

    In 4th – 6th grades Zarah had a ‘critical thinking’ workbook as part of her language arts class. It was pretty much broken up along the categories reflected in that diagram. She enjoyed that part of her school work.

    I find that that system level things she is immersed in as part of her life here with us, are the things she learns all the other sub-components & processes of effortlessly. This is why learning from real life instead of classroom works better. I don’t know how a person would ‘teach’ at the system level. It would have to be hands on projects or attempting to accomplish complex things in a (semi-)realistic environment, then testing learning by documenting all other pieces / processes of the system you were immersed in.

    Zarah doesn’t do so well with learning from the node level up. Much better from the system level down.

  3. My Indigo Kid

    I will show it to Zarah. Malachi is in Houston for the school year, harder to show / talk to him about it. I’ll let you know what she says about it.

    In 4th – 6th grades Zarah had a ‘critical thinking’ workbook as part of her language arts class. It was pretty much broken up along the categories reflected in that diagram. She enjoyed that part of her school work.

    I find that that system level things she is immersed in as part of her life here with us, are the things she learns all the other sub-components & processes of effortlessly. This is why learning from real life instead of classroom works better. I don’t know how a person would ‘teach’ at the system level. It would have to be hands on projects or attempting to accomplish complex things in a (semi-)realistic environment, then testing learning by documenting all other pieces / processes of the system you were immersed in.

    Zarah doesn’t do so well with learning from the node level up. Much better from the system level down.

    • Re: My Indigo Kid

      I think it’s helpful to think of nodes as definitions, but that components are like “unpacking” a definition to think about all its individual elements, while systems or holistic thinking is common in pagan circles but not in mainstream sources except in some exalted circles.

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