Fencing out in the world….

G_________, CT — Rectory School’s ninth grade girl fencers took high honors in the annual Foil tournament for novices on Groundhog Day this year. LS of A___________, CT, acquired the third-place trophy, and EW of P_________, CT, won the sixth-place medal at the end of an extended day of fencing. A total of five Rectory fencers joined 181 others from seventeen other schools from around the state. Team captains EW and ESJ, joined by Coach Watt, led the ninth graders HL RJT, and LS. Competing in a field of eighty-five girls, the Rectory girls did exceptionally well in the seeding pools at the beginning of the day, and then showed a fierce competitive spirit during the Direct Elimination round that followed. Though the boys did not do as well in a larger and more competitive field, they still scored significant personal successes in the course of the day.

The boys fenced first in individual pools of six fencers. J and the other boys fenced each competitor in their pools to five points. Jeong ranked highest in the seeding, earning 24th place, with three victories, twenty touches, and an Indicator of +7. T tied for 58th place with two victories, 15 touches and an indicator of -21. L was seeded in 74th place, with one victory, nine touches and an indicator of -15.

In the second round of competition, L faced the 55th ranked fencer and lost, 15-11. J received a -bye- in the first round of direct elimination. He then fenced the 41st fencer and lost 9-11. T lost his DE bout to the 68th ranked fencer 14-15.

The girls did much better. W and S both won all five of their bouts. W placed second and S placed fourth (due to computer error, statistics for girls’s pools were unavailable). Each proceeded to win two DE bouts in a row. Both girls placed in the top sixteen high school fencers in the state through these victories.

S first bout was 15-8. She won her second bout 15-9. In her third DE, S lost the first point but won the next, the lost the next on a party-riposte. The next several points were traded between opponents, to close the score at 6-6 against S at the close of the first 3-minute period. At the end of the second period, her weariness began to affect her, and the score stood at 13-9. However, the minute pause refreshed her, and she came back to win her bout, 15-14. S was now in the top eight. A lengthier pause preceded her next match, and she had a chance to rest.

W won her first two DE bouts 15-8, and 15-12. After a -bye- in the first round, these second two events propelled her into the top sixteen. Her fourth DE was considerably less challenging at first, and she gained an early lead of 6-1 over her opponent. However, her rising score drove the other player and team into an increasing frenzy, and she thereafter had to push hard to maintain her lead in the match. By the last period, the score was 13-11 in W’s favor, when the match was called on account of the expiration of time. However, the failure to win a full 15 points in a DE cost her the fifth-place spot.

S fenced her final bout against a St. Bernard (Montville) fencer in the final round, to break a tie for third place. Though the other girl twice ran up the score against her, LS was able to come from behind and narrow the score considerably. The final score was a loss for the Rectory fencer, 15-11; even so, it was an impressive performance at the end of an impressive day.

One comment

  1. Sports-writing

    Sports-writing is not my forte, in the same way that sports-writing is Gay Talese’s sport. I think one of its great difficulties is the necessary amount of jargon which hides really quite thrilling actions. It’s much more interesting, if confusing, to watch fencing than it is to read about it. Hence this text, which, alas does not really succeed as a sports story. It’s better than I used to write sports stories, but it’s by no means excellent.

    Advice on writing sports stories to be excellent, would be much appreciated.

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