The Purple Map

The Purple Map colors each state based on its tendency to vote Republican or Democrat overall. It’s a much more comforting image to me in terms of this most recent election, because it demonstrates that there’s strong support across the country for non-Republican policies. I’m not sure that I feel any better about the election results, but at least I know that it’s not all a great sea of red out there.

Thanks.

Also this map from USA Today demonstrates that the Republicans tend to win in rural areas, but that the Democrats tend to win in urban areas. So, while there are vast swaths of territory that are largely Republican, there are bastions of blueness even in the heartland. From this we may assume that there is some chance for Democrats to emerge who are capable of talking to the south and midwest.

8 comments

  1. I’m not whining, I’m simply pointing out why the Democrats lost huge in the Southern states, at least two of which have two Republican Senators for the first time since Reconstruction, Georgia being one of them.

    News flash: The Democats lost in a big way, not in the Presidential races but in the Congressional, for a number of reasons, but strongly because of their demonization of the icons of middle America. That’s not just dumb, its bad strategy. Its terrible strategy. And they won’t really win with a “mandate” (however its being defined this year) until they manage to do something about it.

    The population trends are strongly trending toward Red State growth, for various reasons. More importantly, Red county growth is higher than Blue, and that means that rural areas are adding population that’s in turn more likely to vote Rebublicans than Democratic areas. That is not a good sign for Democratic local and state functionaries. In fact, its brutally dangerous to them holding on to more power.

    The Democrats can’t afford to stereotype the Red States. Moreover, they can’t continue to vilify an iconic “Flyover Country” resident, because they are the voters that the Demos need to win and win solidly. Because they did so, they lost quite a large amount of their Congressional power this year.

    And there are more seats up for challenge in two years.

    How much more right do the Democrats need to go? Far enough that folks like Zell Miller and the rest of the conservative Democrat caucus think its better to work within their own party than cross the aisle to support Republican candidates. That’d be a start. Cutting loose the folks like Michael Moore and Al Franken who really seem to enjoy vilifying the very folks the Demos need to court and speak for might be another.

    American politics really is a popularity contest. You don’t get popular by telling half the population that they’re losers, everything they touch is broken, and that they should defer to their betters. Not in America, anyway. This election proves that.

    Me, I’m a Libertarian, though I held my nose this year and voted for Bush, mainly because he wants to see the ME turned into a place of democratic safety and richness. I admire that dream and support it, because I firmly think the alternative is turning select portions into a sea of glass. Since I find that inasthetic, I’m backing Bush’s foreign policy, and Libertarian domestic. If I had my druthers, the Demos and Repubs could just have CA and NY, so long as they left the rest of us alone.

  2. Yawn.

    I’m kind of sick of whining about the Democrats bad talking the South. We freaking had a Carolinian on the ticket. Bostonians don’t get bent out of shape when they’re depicted as a bunch of heathens with no values who love terrorists. They’re confident in who they are and don’t give a hoot what other people think.

    And please, let’s not pretend there wasn’t a helluva lot of table pounders on the other side who wouldn’t let those Yankees run things. Nor does anyone care that the GOP hasn’t a chance in hell of picking up more than a state or two in the NE. It’s always how sad it is the Dems had to give up the South. Seems to me that was because Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act. Good trade, IMO.

    So, from where I stand Republicans have zero right to complain about regional stereotyping, sorry. Mote, log, etc.

    Yes, there are a lot of good Southerners. A lot of them listen to country, shop at Wal-Mart and vote Democratic. A lot of them doubtless buy expensive lattes and sushi and vote Republican.

    As for the last, how much more right do Democrats have to go be “centrist” anyway? Last I checked, it was a Dem (a Southerner whom some people called “Bubba” — but that’s OK with you because those were Republican bigots) who reformed welfare and balanced the budget.

  3. Except they’ve just spent two years denigrating and vilifying the South (and Country-listening Wal-Mart-shopping truck-driving folk everywhere) as The Enemy, with much table-pounding loud-voiced declarations that “we can’t let those people run things!”

    For the Democrats to have significant pull, at least in the SE, they’ll have to find some new rhetoric and a more centrist voice.

  4. Except they’ve just spent two years denigrating and vilifying the South (and Country-listening Wal-Mart-shopping truck-driving folk everywhere) as The Enemy, with much table-pounding loud-voiced declarations that “we can’t let those people run things!”

    For the Democrats to have significant pull, at least in the SE, they’ll have to find some new rhetoric and a more centrist voice.

    • Yawn.

      I’m kind of sick of whining about the Democrats bad talking the South. We freaking had a Carolinian on the ticket. Bostonians don’t get bent out of shape when they’re depicted as a bunch of heathens with no values who love terrorists. They’re confident in who they are and don’t give a hoot what other people think.

      And please, let’s not pretend there wasn’t a helluva lot of table pounders on the other side who wouldn’t let those Yankees run things. Nor does anyone care that the GOP hasn’t a chance in hell of picking up more than a state or two in the NE. It’s always how sad it is the Dems had to give up the South. Seems to me that was because Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act. Good trade, IMO.

      So, from where I stand Republicans have zero right to complain about regional stereotyping, sorry. Mote, log, etc.

      Yes, there are a lot of good Southerners. A lot of them listen to country, shop at Wal-Mart and vote Democratic. A lot of them doubtless buy expensive lattes and sushi and vote Republican.

      As for the last, how much more right do Democrats have to go be “centrist” anyway? Last I checked, it was a Dem (a Southerner whom some people called “Bubba” — but that’s OK with you because those were Republican bigots) who reformed welfare and balanced the budget.

      • I’m not whining, I’m simply pointing out why the Democrats lost huge in the Southern states, at least two of which have two Republican Senators for the first time since Reconstruction, Georgia being one of them.

        News flash: The Democats lost in a big way, not in the Presidential races but in the Congressional, for a number of reasons, but strongly because of their demonization of the icons of middle America. That’s not just dumb, its bad strategy. Its terrible strategy. And they won’t really win with a “mandate” (however its being defined this year) until they manage to do something about it.

        The population trends are strongly trending toward Red State growth, for various reasons. More importantly, Red county growth is higher than Blue, and that means that rural areas are adding population that’s in turn more likely to vote Rebublicans than Democratic areas. That is not a good sign for Democratic local and state functionaries. In fact, its brutally dangerous to them holding on to more power.

        The Democrats can’t afford to stereotype the Red States. Moreover, they can’t continue to vilify an iconic “Flyover Country” resident, because they are the voters that the Demos need to win and win solidly. Because they did so, they lost quite a large amount of their Congressional power this year.

        And there are more seats up for challenge in two years.

        How much more right do the Democrats need to go? Far enough that folks like Zell Miller and the rest of the conservative Democrat caucus think its better to work within their own party than cross the aisle to support Republican candidates. That’d be a start. Cutting loose the folks like Michael Moore and Al Franken who really seem to enjoy vilifying the very folks the Demos need to court and speak for might be another.

        American politics really is a popularity contest. You don’t get popular by telling half the population that they’re losers, everything they touch is broken, and that they should defer to their betters. Not in America, anyway. This election proves that.

        Me, I’m a Libertarian, though I held my nose this year and voted for Bush, mainly because he wants to see the ME turned into a place of democratic safety and richness. I admire that dream and support it, because I firmly think the alternative is turning select portions into a sea of glass. Since I find that inasthetic, I’m backing Bush’s foreign policy, and Libertarian domestic. If I had my druthers, the Demos and Repubs could just have CA and NY, so long as they left the rest of us alone.

  5. Thanks for the post, helps reconcile a lot in my mind as far as voting is concerned.

    I always find it intersting that cities vote democratic, yet rural areas run republican.

  6. Thanks for the post, helps reconcile a lot in my mind as far as voting is concerned.

    I always find it intersting that cities vote democratic, yet rural areas run republican.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.