Yarn: Untangling

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skein is a unit of yarn, in which an elaborate amount of yarn (often 100-200 yards) is first looped around an object (usually a yarn-swift) numerous times, until there are several dozen loops or spirals of yarn around the arms.  This is then twisted around several times, and then twisted around itself several times, before being tucked into a compact shape that fits easily onto the shelf of a yarn shop. Skeins do not as a general rule, roll or run away from the knitter.IMG_5287.JPG

If you are not careful, though, they easily become a tangled mess. Like this one did.

The only solution is patience, and time.  If you don’t want to give up the yarn, then you have to sit patiently, picking apart the knots and tangles.  This can take a long time; some people don’t believe it’s worth the trouble.  Some people would rather take scissors to the whole thing and churn out two piles of yarn:

  • “bits long enough to work with”
  • “string too short to save”

I belong to the third category of yarn-workers, which demands patience and time while the skein is brought to a new category of order, the yarn ball.

IMG_5288.JPG The yarn sometimes loses a good deal of the sheen and luster that attracted you to it in the yarn store as you do this patient work of untangling. Your partner will roll eyes at you as you do this work, and even tut-tut at you as you nearly scream in frustration at it.  But sooner or later — given enough time, and enough patience — all of the knots and tangles will be removed, and you will have a yarn ball.

It is imperative that all skeins be turned into yarn balls before you start knitting with them.  Under no circumstances should you attempt to knit from a skein, not even “for a few stitches” or “for a few lines of purl” or what-have-you.  ALWAYS take the time to untwist the skein before you knit with it.  Your patience will thank you.

Knitting: Second Hat

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I had some time this weekend, and I was in the mountains where it was cold and rainy over the weekend.  So I spent a fair number of hours working on my second hat.  I finished it on Sunday. And a good thing, too, because I needed it on Monday, when it was again cold and rainy and ugly.

The hat is a little bit on the large side for me. I was trying to scale it up from the “Adult L” size to my extra-large head, and I made it a little too big, I guess.

All the same, there’s a couple of things here that I managed to get right:

  • Ribbing to create a frame for the hat
  • knitting in the round on a circular needle
  • knitting in the round on four double-pointed needles
  • managing decreases (knit2 together)

So, all in all, a successful second hat was made. By me. To wear. Right away. I’m eager to make another one, but this time I think I’ll keep it at the Adult L size, rather than trying to add in another 18 or so stitches to make it conform to what I ‘think’ is the correct size.  This kind of thing only gets easier with practice.

The next challenges?  Socks and mittens.  Then gloves.

Knit: hat take2

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A while back, I tried making a hat. This Easter weekend, I got to finish it. In the process, I learned how to reduce and end a hat; and how to transfer knitting from working on ‘circular needles’ with a cable between the left and right needle, to four double-pointed needles.  Im sorry to say that my efforts to make a hat resembled something rather more like a floppy Frisbee cozy — more suited for covering a pie plate than a hat. The dome structure we associate with a beanie or slouch-stye knitted cap was almost entirely absent. As you can see, it was not an ideal construction.   It comes together nicely in the middle— but the outer edge, where one starts, is simply flat.

What went wrong?

The essence of the trouble is that I simply didn’t take the time to establish ribbing around the base of the hat. I should have begun with the end in mind — and started by establishing the defined edge.

The ‘defined edge’ that begins something like a hat is called 1×1 ribbing, and it’s done with a series of knit and purl stitches.

I did some investigation, and found several patterns from Tin Can Knits — not just hats, but also patterns for scarves and sweaters, shawls and socks. It seems to me that this is the core of a knitter’s repertoire, so I’ve printed out their patterns and I’ve been following along at home.

  1. Let’s knit a hat
  2. Knitting Socks
  3. Knitting Mittens and Handwarmers

So I’m starting again. This is actually take four — I put the ribbing on the  circular needles for a pattern and discovered that my needles were too long for the hat pattern I’m trying.  But the ribbing works. And in the process I’ve internalized the hand motions that need to happen when attempting to learn the purl stitch.

Which is not a minor accomplishment in itself — I don’t think I genuinely understood what the purl stitch did before today.  Yet now I do, sort of: it ‘digs a ditch’ in the yarn pattern, either resulting in cabling that stands out or recessed patterns that allow shadows to catch. This is Tin Can Knit’s language, sort of, not mine.   Yet now it has a purpose, a reason for being in my knitting tool-kit, so to speak: ribbing.

I’m kind of hoping this hat fits me.  I expanded it beyond the top TCK pattern size, in the hopes that it would fit my head… I like the idea that the first hat I make is for me.

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