Worksheets

A while back I created a worksheet that I called “ONE HUNDRED WORDS.” Original title for a worksheet that had a line for your name, another line for the date, a line for a title, and a hundred blank lines. It was a tool to get kids to learn to write a hundred words on a subject. At the end were three quick editing ideas.

Today in class, one of my students insisted he could write a thousand words. One of the other students stared in horror, and said that maybe she could write two hundred and fifty words, but that was her limit. A third student (I should say the third student, since there were/are only three students in this class) thought he could do five hundred words, but not a thousand.

Behold! I now have worksheets for 100-words, 250-words, 300-words, 500-words, 750 words, and 1000-words. Most of them are two pages, but the 750-word one is three, and the 1000-word one is four. All of them have word counters; every seventy words, there’s a little line break and a number in parenthesis to tell you how many words you’ve written. (I’ve told them no more than 70 words in a paragraph).

I also created another little worksheet, called the Poetry Worksheet. Across the top it says, “I’m trying to write a poem about…” with little check boxes for emotion, an image, or a story. Then there are check boxes for short, medium or long; Rhyming/not Rhyming/sometimes rhyming; and “line length” is short/long/varied.

Perhaps this seems silly to some readers. However, these three students are in need of some serious remedial writing help, and I’m hoping that these tools will help them grasp some new options for their writing practice. Basically I’ve been stripped of books and curriculum in this three-person class, and I needed some ideas about what to teach, and how. Maybe these worksheets will work, especially since the students themselves don’t seem really challenged by 100-word worksheets any more.

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12 comments

  1. You probably can do this with science. If you moved to 3-ring notebooks for lab reports, you could hand out pre-formatted lab pages for some kinds of projects and with some grade levels. That’s really all these sheets are, is pre-formatted workshop sheets.

    Also, not so useful now, but maybe useful later on, next year.
    http://www.textmapping.org/index.html

    This suggests that you photocopy pages from a book, assemble them into a scroll, and teach big-picture concepts by taping the whole chapter to the board, and mapping out the text with your students. It’s an interesting idea, and I plan on planning my unit on Rome and the Barbarians using this methodology.

    • You probably can do this with science. If you moved to 3-ring notebooks for lab reports, you could hand out pre-formatted lab pages for some kinds of projects and with some grade levels. That’s really all these sheets are, is pre-formatted workshop sheets.

      Also, not so useful now, but maybe useful later on, next year.
      http://www.textmapping.org/index.html

      This suggests that you photocopy pages from a book, assemble them into a scroll, and teach big-picture concepts by taping the whole chapter to the board, and mapping out the text with your students. It’s an interesting idea, and I plan on planning my unit on Rome and the Barbarians using this methodology.

  2. That’s actually not a bad idea. It could go well with the “poetry worksheet” as an exercise.

    The technical term for those, by the way, is an “abcedarium”, which I’ve always thought rather delicious.

  3. I always enjoyed doing alphabet stories and it works on dictionary skills too (it’s hard to find “x” words that fit with your story..) If you haven’t done them before, basically they’re 26 line stories with each line starting with the letters of the alphabet, in sequence. Might add some challenge to the 100 word worksheets..

  4. I always enjoyed doing alphabet stories and it works on dictionary skills too (it’s hard to find “x” words that fit with your story..) If you haven’t done them before, basically they’re 26 line stories with each line starting with the letters of the alphabet, in sequence. Might add some challenge to the 100 word worksheets..

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